Virtualization Adapted Adapting Business Processes for Virtual Infrastrcuture (and vice-versa)

2012/03/07

Possible Probable Plausible

Filed under: Uncategorized — iben @ 21:05

Possibility is the condition or fact of being possible. The Latin origins of the word hint at ability. Possibility also refers to something that “could happen”, that is not precluded by the facts, but usually not probable. Impossible denotes that something literally cannot happen or be done.

Probability, or chance, is a way of expressing knowledge or belief that an event will occur or has occurred. In mathematics the concept has been given an exact meaning in probability theory, that is used extensively in such areas of study as mathematics, statistics, finance, gambling, science, and philosophy to draw conclusions about the likelihood of potential events and the underlying mechanics of complex systems.

Plausible deniability is, at root, credible (plausible) ability to deny a fact or allegation, or to deny previous knowledge of a fact. The term most often refers to the denial of blame in (formal or informal) chains of command, where upper rungs quarantine the blame to the lower rungs, and the lower rungs are often inaccessible, meaning confirming responsibility for the action is nearly impossible. In the case that illegal or otherwise disreputable and unpopular activities become public, high-ranking officials may deny any awareness of such act or any connection to the agents used to carry out such acts. It typically implies forethought, such as intentionally setting up the conditions to plausibly avoid responsibility for one’s (future) actions or knowledge.

2009/04/19

Cracking Cisco Passwords with John the Ripper

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , — iben @ 19:12

InfoSec Survival Guide: Cracking Cisco Passwords with John

http://infosecsurvivalguide.blogspot.com/2008/11/cracking-cisco-passwords-with-john.html

http://www.openwall.com/john/pro/macosx/

http://www.macshadows.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=8506

John the Ripper 1.7.3.1
http://mac.softpedia.com/get/Security/John-the-Ripper.shtml

John the Ripper 1.7.2 for G4 PowerPC, G5 PowerPC and Intel Macs (Universal Binary) (released 11/30/07)
http://www.macunix.net/JTR/john-1.7.2-macosx-universal.zip

Download the pre-patched (for OS X salted SHA1 hashes too) pre-compiled version of John the Ripper here:
http://www.macunix.net/JTR/

Unzip the archive.

Open Terminal.

Drag the file “john” from the folder “run” from within the unzipped “john-1.7.2-macosx-universal” folder to the Terminal window and let go.

Type a space.

Drag the text file containing your hash ( student:078D486A55E9922772C7F6F46113038E4800D6EDF4D31720 ) to the Terminal window and let go.

Click back in the Terminal window and press the return key.
QUOTE
Loaded 1 password hash (Salt SHA1 [salt-sha1])
barlow (student)

2009/04/16

VMware ESX host command line configuration script

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , — iben @ 14:46

#customize esxXX by IR Date YYYYMMDD
# ESX host configuration script for company.com
# configure as needed for esxXX by changing IP addresses below…
# configure 4 nics for nfs storage
# nic 1 and 3 – cos1, vms, vmotion
# nic 2 and 4 – vmkernel for nfs storage
#

#configure SYSLOG
echo “*.* @syslog.site.company.com” >> /etc/syslog.conf
service syslog restart

# List current config
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-nics -l
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -l

#creating virtual switches
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -a vSwitch1
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -L vmnic1 vSwitch1
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -L vmnic3 vSwitch1
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -L vmnic2 vSwitch0
#enable CDP advertise and listen mode
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -b vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -b vSwitch1
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -B both vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -B both vSwitch1
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -b vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -b vSwitch1

#creating portgroups
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -A “ITG-VLAN2” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -A “PUBLIC-VLAN4” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -A “VMkVMotion-VLAN209” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -A “VMkStorage-VLAN207” vSwitch1
#/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -A “Service Console” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -A “Service Console 2” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswif -a -i 10.102.8.111 -n 255.255.255.0 -p “Service Console 2” vswif1
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -A “ESX-VLAN208” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vmknic -a -i 10.102.7.211 -n 255.255.255.0 VMkStorage-VLAN207
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vmknic -a -i 10.102.9.211 -n 255.255.255.0 VMkVMotion-VLAN209
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-route -a 0.0.0.0/0 10.102.7.1
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswif -l
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vmknic -l

vmware-vim-cmd hostsvc/net/vswitch_setpolicy –nicteaming-policy=loadbalance_ip vSwitch0
vmware-vim-cmd hostsvc/net/vswitch_setpolicy –nicteaming-policy=loadbalance_ip vSwitch1
vmware-vim-cmd /hostsvc/net/vswitch_setpolicy –failurecriteria-check-beacon 0 vSwitch0
vmware-vim-cmd /hostsvc/net/vswitch_setpolicy –failurecriteria-check-beacon 0 vSwitch1
vmware-vim-cmd hostsvc/net/vswitch_setpolicy –securepolicy-promisc=false vSwitch0
vmware-vim-cmd hostsvc/net/vswitch_setpolicy –securepolicy-macchange=false vSwitch0
vmware-vim-cmd hostsvc/net/vswitch_setpolicy –securepolicy-forgedxmit=false vSwitch0
vmware-vim-cmd hostsvc/net/vswitch_setpolicy –securepolicy-promisc=false vSwitch1
vmware-vim-cmd hostsvc/net/vswitch_setpolicy –securepolicy-macchange=false vSwitch1
vmware-vim-cmd hostsvc/net/vswitch_setpolicy –securepolicy-forgedxmit=false vSwitch1

#configuring vlans
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -l
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -v 2 -p “ITG-VLAN2” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -v 4 -p “PUBLIC-VLAN4” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -v 207 -p “VMkStorage-VLAN207” vSwitch1
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -v 209 -p “VMkVMotion-VLAN209” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -v 208 -p “Service Console” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -v 208 -p “Service Console 2” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -v 208 -p “ESX-VLAN208” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -l

#delete vmnic1 from vSwitch0 (run these if necessary)
#/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -N vmnic1 -p “ITG-VLAN2” vSwitch0
#/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -N vmnic1 -p “PUBLIC-VLAN4” vSwitch0
#/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -N vmnic1 -p “VMkStorage-VLAN207” vSwitch0
#/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -N vmnic1 -p “VMkVMotion-VLAN209” vSwitch0
#/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -N vmnic1 -p “Service Console” vSwitch0
#/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -N vmnic1 -p “Service Console 2” vSwitch0
#/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -N vmnic1 -p “ESX-VLAN208” vSwitch0

#add vmnics to each port group
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -M vmnic2 -p “ITG-VLAN2” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -M vmnic2 -p “PUBLIC-VLAN4” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -M vmnic1 -p “VMkStorage-VLAN207” vSwitch1
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -M vmnic3 -p “VMkStorage-VLAN207” vSwitch1
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -M vmnic2 -p “VMkVMotion-VLAN209” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -M vmnic2 -p “Service Console” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -M vmnic2 -p “Service Console 2” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -M vmnic2 -p “ESX-VLAN208” vSwitch0
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -l

sleep 10

#setup vmotion on the first vmk network
#vmware-vim-cmd “hostsvc/vmotion/netconfig_get” (check config)
vmware-vim-cmd hostsvc/vmotion/vnic_set vmk1

#/usr/sbin/esxcfg-vswitch -l

vmware-vim-cmd /hostsvc/net/portgroup_set –nicorderpolicy-active=vmnic0 vSwitch0 “Service Console”
vmware-vim-cmd /hostsvc/net/portgroup_set –nicorderpolicy-standby=vmnic2 vSwitch0 “Service Console”
vmware-vim-cmd /hostsvc/net/portgroup_set –nicorderpolicy-active=vmnic0 vSwitch0 “Service Console 2”
vmware-vim-cmd /hostsvc/net/portgroup_set –nicorderpolicy-standby=vmnic2 vSwitch0 “Service Console 2”
vmware-vim-cmd /hostsvc/net/portgroup_set –nicorderpolicy-active=vmnic0 vSwitch0 “VMkVMotion-VLAN209”
vmware-vim-cmd /hostsvc/net/portgroup_set –nicorderpolicy-standby=vmnic2 vSwitch0 “VMkVMotion-VLAN209”

#adding Network Attached data store
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-nas -l
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-nas -a -o NAS1-ip -s /vol/vmw_datastore1 vmw_datastore1
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-nas -a -o NAS2-ip -s /vol/vmw_datastore2 vmw_datastore2
#/usr/sbin/esxcfg-nas -a -o NAS3-ip -s /vol/vol3_vmware_test nfs_vol_netapp
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-nas -l

#configure resolv.conf
/bin/cat /dev/null > /etc/resolv.conf
echo “nameserver ns1-ip” >> /etc/resolv.conf
echo “nameserver ns2.ip” >> /etc/resolv.conf
echo “search site.company.com” >> /etc/resolv.conf
cat /etc/resolv.conf

#configure hostname
vmware-vim-cmd hostsvc/net/dns_set –dns-hostname=esxXX
vmware-vim-cmd hostsvc/net/dns_set –dns-domainname=site.company.com

#configure NTP
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-firewall -e ntpClient
/usr/sbin/ntpdate -u ntp1.site.company.com
chkconfig –list ntpd
chkconfig –level 35 ntpd on
chkconfig –list ntpd
echo “restrict ntp1-ip mask 255.255.255.255 nomodify notrap noquery” >> /etc/ntp.conf
echo “server ntp1.site.company.com” >> /etc/ntp.conf
echo “restrict ntp2-ip mask 255.255.255.255 nomodify notrap noquery” >> /etc/ntp.conf
echo “server ntp2.site.company.com” >> /etc/ntp.conf
echo “restrict ntp3-ip mask 255.255.255.255 nomodify notrap noquery” >> /etc/ntp.conf
echo “server ntp3.site.company.com” >> /etc/ntp.conf
echo “driftfile /var/lib/ntp/drift” >> /etc/ntp.conf
echo “ntp1-ip” > /etc/ntp/step-tickers
echo “ntp2-ip” >> /etc/ntp/step-tickers
echo “ntp3-ip” >> /etc/ntp/step-tickers
service ntpd restart
hwclock –systohc

#configure SUDO

esxcfg-boot -g
esxcfg-boot -b

esxcfg-advcfg -s 32 /NFS/MaxVolumes

# make sure that NFS locks are not disabled
esxcfg-advcfg -s 0 /NFS/LockDisable

# this should already be set correctly, but just to make sure
esxcfg-advcfg -s 12 /NFS/HeartbeatFrequency

# this should also be set correctly already
esxcfg-advcfg -s 10 /NFS/HeartbeatMaxFailures

# increase the heap size. Default is 9.
esxcfg-advcfg -s 30 /Net/TcpIpHeapSize

# increase heap max. Default is 30.
esxcfg-advcfg -s 120 /Net/TcpIpHeapMax

#configure AD
/usr/sbin/esxcfg-auth –enablead –addomain=site.company.com –addc=DC-NAME.site.company.com
useradd IT1
useradd IT2
#useradd Administrator

#configure SNMP
/bin/cat /dev/null > /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf
echo “syscontact IT-TEAM-DL@company.com” >> /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf
echo “syslocation Company-Location” >> /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf
echo “rocommunity RO-String” >> /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf
echo “trapcommunity RO-String” >> /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf
echo “trapsink DELL-IT-Assistant-Server.site.company.com RO-String” >> /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf
echo “dlmod SNMPESX /usr/lib/vmware/snmp/libSNMPESX.so” >> /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf
echo “smuxpeer .1.3.6.1.4.1.674.10892.1” >> /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf

#install Dell OpenManage Agent
esxcfg-firewall -o 80,tcp,out,http
/usr/bin/lwp-download http://DELL-IT-Assistant-Server.site.company.com/OM_5.5.0_ManNode_A00.targz
tar -xvf OM_5.5.0_ManNode_A00.tar.gz
cd linux/supportscripts/
./srvadmin-install.sh -b -w -r -s
srvadmin-services.sh start
esxcfg-firewall -o 1311,tcp,in,OpenManageRequest

#test by going to https://esxXX.site.company.com:1311

# service mgmt-vmware restart # if needed

#end of script

procedure to find port by ip arp mac

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , , , — iben @ 14:21

procedure to find port by ip arp mac

Assumptions:
You have an IP address and want to find out what switch port it is on.
There is a core switch with edge switches and Cisco CDP is running.
Example: IP address is 10.1.1.69
– find the MAC address of this IP
open ssh console to core switch and run “sh arp”
coreswitch#sh arp | inc 10.1.1.69
Internet 10.1.7.69 0 0007.1234.cd43 ARPA Vlan5
– find port from MAC address
coreswitch#sh mac-address-table dynamic | inc 0007.1234.cd43
* 5 0007.1234.cd43 dynamic Yes 5 Gi7/12
– find edge switch for port
coreswitch#sh cdp nei gi7/12
Capability Codes: R – Router, T – Trans Bridge, B – Source Route Bridge
S – Switch, H – Host, I – IGMP, r – Repeater, P – Phone
Device ID Local Intrfce Holdtme Capability Platform Port ID
edgeswitch.company.net
Gig 7/12 176 S I WS-C3560G-Gig 0/49
– open ssh console to edge switch and run “sh arp” repeat process

2009/04/13

NMAP tricks

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , — iben @ 22:49

How to use NMAP to count the number of hosts on a given subnet.

#!/bin/bash
echo 4192 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/neigh/default/gc_thresh3
nmap -sP -PI $1 -n –max_rtt_timeout 5000 –initial_rtt_timeout 5000 | tail -1 | cut -f 2 -d “(” | cut -f 1 -d ” ” 2> /dev/null

(Thanks to Gabriel for this one!)

2009/04/07

VMware ESX setting static mac addresses

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , — iben @ 15:22

1. Select a static MAC. NOTE: Static MAC addresses must be in the range of 00:50:56:00:00:00-00:50:56:3F:FF:FF to work with this procedure.
2. Remember to record the Static MAC addresses registered for future reference.
3. Unregister vm:
4. Note the datastore, vm inventory folder, and name for the vm in the summary tab
5. Power down the virtual machine
6. Right click the vm and select remove from inventory
7. Edit vmx:
8. Ssh to the esx host system (use putty)
9. cd /vmfs/volumes/
10. cd to the system’s folder
11. cp .vmx to .vmx.bak
12. vi .vmx
13. find the ethernet0 section
14. make the following changes:
15. change ethernet0.addressType = “vpx” to ethernet0.addressType = “static”
16. ethernet0.generatedAddress = “00:50:56:01.01.00” to ethernet0.address = “00:50:56:01.01.00”
17. rearrange so the following items are in this order and grouped together: ethernet0.address, ethernet0.addresstype, uuid.location, uuid.bios
18. Write the changes to the disk and exit
19. Reregister the vm:
20. In virtual center, browse to the host datastore (configuration, storage, double click on the vm’s datastore)
21. Browse to the edited .vmx file
22. Right click the .vmx file and select Add to Inventory
23. Enter the system name
24. Select the host
25. Select the resource pool
26. Click Finish
27. Power on the vm and verify the mac address
28. Windows: ipconfig /all find “Physical Address”
29. Linux: ifconfig /a grep Hwaddr

EXAMPLE

ethernet0.address = “00:50:56:88:6f:98”

ethernet0.addressType = “static”

uuid.location = “56 4d 6b b4 70 cc 85 24-59 1b 2d 24 0a 2b d7 7a”

uuid.bios = “50 08 5b 0d e1 f7 fb 8b-ba 39 74 1b 30 fc 0c 40”

Posted by Jae Ellers at Monday, January 28, 2008.
http://vmprofessional.com/2008/01/setting-static-mac-addresses.html

This post rocks! Helped me out of a tight bind today.

2009/03/28

Monitoring Machine Setup Project

Filed under: Uncategorized — iben @ 23:37

CentOS 4.6 system setup
VMware Tools Installed
DAG yum repo configured
Install smokeping
http://lzheng.blogspot.com/2007/02/install-smokeping-via-yum.html
http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/networking/?p=334&tag=rbxccnbtr1
http://oss.oetiker.ch/smokeping/pub/
wget http://oss.oetiker.ch/smokeping/pub/smokeping-2.4.1.tar.gz

tar xvzf smokeping-2.4.1.tar.gz
mv smokeping-2.4.1 /usr/local/smokeping
chown -R root:root /usr/local/smokeping

cd /usr/local/smokeping/bin
for foo in *.dist; do cp $foo `basename $foo .dist`; done

cd /usr/local/smokeping/etc/
for foo in *.dist; do cp $foo `basename $foo .dist`; done

cd /usr/local/smokeping/htdocs
for foo in *.dist; do cp $foo `basename $foo .dist`; done

# cpan
cpan> install HTTP::Request

Upgrade perl from 5.8.4 to 5.8.9
rpm -vhU http://downloads.activestate.com/ActivePerl/Linux/5.8/ActivePerl-5.8.9.825-i686-linux-glibc-2.3.2-288577.rpm

vi /usr/local/smokeping/bin/smokeping
change the first line to be as follows to reference latest version.
#!/opt/ActivePerl-5.8/bin -w

2009/03/25

Kensington Guardian Premium 6 Outlet Surge

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — iben @ 12:23

This is the best power strip for home and office.
Mfg. Part: 62132
CDW Part: 146408
UNSPSC: 39121610

No power switch. Eliminates accidental equipment power off events.
LED Power indicator. Tells you outlet is live.
Expand power options with six outlets and surge protection
Six outlets from a single electrical connection.
220 joules of protection guards equipment against spikes.
Peace of mind with up to $2,500 for replacing equipment damaged while connected.

6-outlet surge protector with a 5-foot power cord.
Guardian® Premium Strip is backed by the Kensington Limited Lifetime Warranty.
http://us.kensington.com/html/13265.html
http://www.cdw.com/shop/products/default.aspx?edc=146408
http://www.amazon.com/Kensington-62132A-Guardian-6-Outlet-Protector/dp/B00004Z5OA

Cost: $12.00
Purchase 10 and they come in one box.

2009/03/08

Hello world!

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 23:02

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